14 unusual frogs around the globe

14 unusual frogs around the globe

Hundreds of frog species are sliding toward extinction and there are so many species many of us don't know about. There are frogs in many colors, you can find them green, red, blue, yellow orange and brown, which face threats from habitat loss, climate change, and deadly chytrid fungus infections. Nearly half of frog species are under threat, as amphibians are among the groups hardest hit by today's many strikes against wildlife. 

Here is a list of 14 unusual frogs from around the world:

1. Tomato Frog

Dyschophus antongilii. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

Colored as red a ketchup, the Tomato frog’s bright color is meant to warn predators that it is not safe to eat. The frogs secrete a gummy substance that gets in a predator’s eyes so it will drop the frog, which can then make a quick escape. The Tomato frog is found only in Madagascar. (Source)

2. Glass Transparent Frogs

Chimerella corleone. Photo by Evan Twomey, National Geographic. (Image Source)

Glass frogs are nocturnal tree frogs that live in the humid forests of Central and South America. Chimerella corleone, owes its mafia clan title to one team member’s obsession with The Godfather novel and film trilogy. Detected only in the spray zone of waterfalls in Peru, the frog hardly looks menacing considering it’s just two centimeters (0.79 inches) in length. However, it does happen to conceal a spike-like bone in its upper arm. (Source)

3. Amazon Horned Frog

Ceratophrys cornuta. Photo by George Grall, National Geographic. (Image Source)

Amazon horned frogs are indiscriminate eaters, they can grow to about the size of a small plate. hese rotund amphibians can grow to 8 inches (20 centimeters) in length and would cover a good-size tea saucer. They are found in freshwater marshes and pools throughout the Amazon Basin, from Colombia to Brazil. (Source)

4. Mexican Dumpy Tree Frog

Pachymedusa dacnicolor. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

This species is nocturnal, spending it’s days hidden under logs, rocks and things of that nature. It comes out at night to feed on insects. They have a distinct rusty reddish coloration on their bellies, feet and around the bottom of the mouth. It is found on the western coast of southern Mexico in subtropical or tropical dry forests. (Source)

5. Limon Harlequin Frog

Atelopus limon. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

This rare Limon harlequin frog looks majestic in Limón, Ecuador.  Harlequin frog is a neo-tropical toad that was once quite wide spread living throughout Costa Rica and Panama. The species is listed as critically endangered and is thought to be living primarily in Panama today. There are many factors that have lead to the demise of this species including changes in the air quality, temperature, precipitation, stream flow patterns, and the spread of a deadly fungus all of which can be owed to global warming. (Source)

6. Blue Poison Dart Frog

Dendrobates azureus. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

These frogs are considered one of Earth's most toxic, or poisonous, species. For example, the golden poison dart frog has enough poison to kill 20,000 mice. With a range of bright colors—yellows, oranges, reds, greens, blues—they aren't just big show-offs either. Those colorful designs tell potential predators, "I'm toxic. Don't eat me." Scientists think that poison dart frogs get their toxicity from some of the insects they eat. (Source)

7. Vietnamese Mossy Frog

Theloderma corticale. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

The Vietnamese mossy frog, is a species of frog in the Rhacophoridae family. It is found in Vietnam and possibly China. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, intermittent freshwater marches, and rocky areas. The common name of the mossy frog arises from the fact that its skin is a mottled green and black that resembles moss growing on rock, and forms an effective form of camouflage. (Source)

8. Budgett's Frog

Lepidobatrachus laevis. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

Budgett’s frogs, sometimes known as hippo frogs, are becoming increasingly popular pets. These frogs live for 15 to 20 years, and adults grow to be between 31⁄2 and 5 inches long, with exceptional specimens reaching 6 inches. The somewhat-comical appearance of these large-bodied, big-mouthed frogs makes them attractive to many hobbyists. (Source)

9. Angolan River Frog

Amietia angolensis. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

These frogs are light brown with darker brown spots and green stripes down the back and sides. Collected from Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park gather ‘round.

10. Marsupial Frog

Gastrotheca pseustes. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

An endangered marsupial frog (Gastrotheca pseustes) poses in Quito, Ecuador. The photo appeared in a 2009 National Geographic article about the chytrid fungus’ deadly effect on amphibians.

11. Painted Frog

Mantella madagascariensis. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

Is a species of frog in the Mantellidae family. It is endemic to Madagascar. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and rivers. It is threatened by habitat loss. (Source)

12. Albino Green Frog

Rana clamitans. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

Albino frogs are a fairly common occurance with frogs. Albinism is a condition caused by a recessive gene which causes a person or animal to be born lacking normal pigmentation. What you end up with is usually a pinkish or whitish or GHOSTLY looking frog, with really weird-looking red eyes. The eyes appear red because the blood vessels of the retina show through the iris, giving it a pink or reddish color. The eyes of albino animals (and people!) tend to be highly sensitive to light. (Source)

13. Poison Devil Frog

Oophaga sylvatica. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

Sometimes known with its Spanish name 'diablito', is a species of frog found in southwestern Colombia and northwestern Ecuador. Its natural habitat is lowland and submontane rainforest; it can, however, can survive in moderately degraded areas, at least in the more humid parts of its range. It is threatened by habitat loss (deforestation) and agricultural pollution. (Source)

14. Spiny Hopper Frog

Scaphiophryne pustulosa. Photo by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark. (Image Source)

A fairly active species, especially around dusk from the Ankaratra Mountains of central Madagascar. Occurs in cool, very dense forests where it may be active during day. Females represent the largest of the Scaphiophryne, attaining 55mm although it is not as stocky as other species. Like other Scaphiophrynes, it is also still fairly uncommon in captive collections. (Source)

Published on: March 2016
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